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Course Descriptions

GOVMT 952
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is an introduction to the law of the administrative state—to the constitutional, statutory and judge-made rules governing what agencies may do, the procedures they must follow, and how they can be held to account. Topics include mechanisms for control of agencies by the legislative and executive branches; the constitutional basis for, and limits on, governance by agencies; the availability and effects of judicial review over agency action; and the features of agency rulemaking and adjudication.

Prerequisites:
None
CRIML 953
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the constitutional, statutory and rule-based issues that arise in the formal processing of a criminal case. Subject include the decision to charge, prosecutorial discretion, grand jury and preliminary hearing, joinder and severance, bail and pretrial release, discovery, plea bargaining and guilty pleas, speedy trial, jury composition and selection, pre-trial publicity, confrontation, cross-examination and the privilege against self-incrimination.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
TAX 950
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is designed to continue the examination of the basic substantive provisions of the federal income tax law begun in Basic Federal Income Taxation, including the following general topics: income splitting and assignment, realization and recognition of gain and loss, capital transactions, the investment credit, and other taxable entities.

Prerequisites:
TAX 949 Basic Federal Income Taxation
IHIMM 995B
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This two-credit clinical experience will be open to students who have previously enrolled in the 5 credit Center for Immigrants' Rights Course and will build upon the skills they have learned. The course will involve a senior role in pending cases at the Center; involvement in new initiatives undertaken by the clinic; and possible writing and editing of a publishable material in the area of immigrants' rights. There will be no classroom component.

Prerequisites:
IHIMM 995A Center for Immigrants' Rights and INTER 961 Asylum & Refugee Law, Faculty Approval Required
IHSDP 995A
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Students in the Advanced section of the Clinic will provide important continuity to longer-term Clinic projects.  Advanced Clinic students will meet with and work with first semester Clinic students, with heightened expectations for leadership and more comprehensive research, analysis, and work product.

Prerequisites:
Faculty approval required.
Faculty:
LLMLW 902
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Building on the Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems course, students will continue to develop legal analysis, writing and research skills in the persuasive writing context. Students will study and practice effective client letter writing to help students learn to craft good correspondence in a U.S. legal setting. The final portion of the course will cover contract drafting.

Prerequisites:
LLMLW 900 Introduction to the United States Legal System, LLMLW 902 enrollment is limited to LL.M. candidates.
CL&CR 976
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course focuses on torts not involving physical injury, such as misrepresentation, defamation, invasion of privacy, interference with business relations, and misuse of legal procedure. These subjects are not ordinarily covered in the four-hour Torts course required in the first year, but have become burgeoning areas of potential liability due to the emergence of electronic communications. An effort will be made to integrate substantive doctrine and practice implications with legal, economic, political and social theory.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SKILS 950R/L
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course introduces the fundamental skills of trial advocacy applicable in civil and criminal trials in any jurisdiction. In keeping with the theory that trial advocacy is best learned by "doing," each student will conduct written and oral exercises concerning the various stages of the trial process-pleadings, pretrial motions, discovery, settlement negotiations, trial preparation, jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination of lay witnesses, examination of expert witnesses, trial motions, and closing arguments. Students are able to evaluate their own progress through viewing videotapes of their performances. The class meets jointly for lectures, while the oral trial exercises are conducted in small sections. This course is available to third-year students only.

Prerequisites:
SKILS 955 Evidence (may also be taken concurrently)
SKILS 951
Credits:
3
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

Students synthesize the individual trial skills learned in Advocacy I by preparing and conducting an entire case, from the initial interview of the client through a trial on the merits. Each case is tried before a jury and judge from a Pennsylvania or federal court. All trials are videotaped in their entirety.

Prerequisites:
SKILS 950 Advocacy I
Faculty:
CCLAW 955
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course surveys the law of unincorporated business entities. The agency law part of the course will focus on agents' powers and responsibilities, liabilities of principals for acts of agents, and termination of the agency relationship. The partnership law part of the course will cover the fiduciary obligations of partners, partners' management and property rights, and partnership dissolutions. The final part of the course will examine the "new" limited liability entities now provided for by the law of all states, with emphasis on the formation, organization, and dissolution of limited liability companies. Although not a prerequisite, this course is strongly recommended for students planning to enroll in Corporations.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 956
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course will introduce students to the range of current and emerging issues that confront agricultural producers, agri-business firms, and other segments of that broader sector of the economy referred to as the "food industry." The course will address a variety of issues including the history and objectives of agricultural policy, land use planning for agricultural activities, resource use and allocation, industrialization in the agricultural sector, intergenerational transfers of farm businesses, international trade, and ethical issues that confront practitioners.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
INTER 997B Fall 2011
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will provide a survey of selected topics in the twentieth-century history of American law. Among topics expected to be covered: the development of banking and financial regulation; legal formalism and its Progressive and legal-realist critiques; the development of law schools and the organized legal profession; the "rights revolution" of the Warren Court and the resulting political backlash; and the rise of the modern administrative state.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
PERSP 979
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

In this course we will address how legal systems and administrative agencies make decisions that affect nonhuman animals. The course will focus on the origins, background, and evolution of animal law and address specific substantive areas involving animals such as the concept of animals as property; contract and tort issues related to animals, animal protection laws; constitutional law issues; animal exploitation and the government regulation of animals.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 991
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is principally an examination of antitrust law and policy in the U.S. as evolved through prosecutions by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission. There is brief coverage of: (a) European Union and Canadian competition laws plus evolving proposals for supranational norms; and (b) leading market regulatory schemes such as those affecting marketing of foods, drugs, textiles, toxic substances, securities, and consumer products. In the antitrust area, commercial conduct alleged to violate price fixing, market allocation, tying, exclusive dealing, asset acquisition, and price discrimination norms are considered at length with some attention to state antitrust law.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SKILS 997A Fall 2014
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Following a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) enforcement action from inception through an appeal in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, and a subsequent appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, this course will teach students key concepts of appellate procedure, and provide students with practical experience in using persuasive advocacy skills when drafting appellate briefs and making an oral argument to an appellate court.  Class discussions will explore the decision making processes of appellate lawyers so that students better understand (1) the thoroughness of the analytical skills that appellate lawyers must employ; (2) the knowledge of litigation and appellate procedure that appellate lawyers must possess; (3) the strategic and tactical decisions that appellate lawyers must make when writing appellate briefs; and (4) the ability to think and react quickly that appellate lawyers must have when arguing before an appellate court.  The course will begin with some basic instruction in SEC enforcement actions, the basic substantive securities laws that govern the appellate case that will be studied, and appellate procedural rules.  The course will then teach advocacy skills in writing and oral argument by following the SEC enforcement action through its principal phases, from the complaint, the motion to dismiss, and the appellate briefs and arguments before the D.C. Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
IHASE 995A
Credits:
1-2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This clinic is designed to acquaint students with the unique yet pragmatic knowledge and skills incident to rendering quality legal service in the art, sports, and entertainment professions. The clinic may be taken for 1 or 2 graded credits. Visit the Art, Sports and Entertainment Law Clinic for more information.

Prerequisites:
SEM 927 Law of Artistic Persons and Properties Seminar, Faculty approval required.
INTER 961
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This class surveys the laws of political asylum and related protection for those fleeing danger in their home countries. It examines asylum and refugee law and policy in the United States, and sets forth the legal grounds for barring someone from asylum. It also explores the politics driving immigration policy, including asylum and refugee policy, and the federal agencies that implement those policies.

Prerequisites:
None
GOVMT 985
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course seeks to give the students a firm grounding in the law governing the domestic use of airspace for transportation and recreation. The licensing requirements for pilots, the struggle of the aviation industry to adapt to the market, the safety and security of passengers and the problems involved in building airports are just a few of the topics covered. The course provides an opportunity for those students who are interested in aviation to apply many of the subjects they have studied in law school to a particular area of human activity. The cases studied in the course involve, inter alia: Administrative Law, Antitrust, Bankruptcy, Conflicts of Law, Contracts, Local Government Law, Environmental Law, Labor Law, Property, Sales, Taxation and Torts.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 957
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will focus on banks as financial intermediaries and compare them to both the securities and insurance industries. The dual banking system of state and federal regulation will be explored as to bank formation, supervision and regulation. The course will explore the ownership and control issues affecting banks and the supervision and regulation of bank holding companies and their subsidiaries engaged in nontraditional banking activities. The causes of the financial crisis of 2007-2009, together with the reaction of financial institutions, the states, the U.S. Congress and the regulators to the crisis, will also be examined. The course will include an assessment of the deposit insurance system and the problems associated with troubled and failed banks. The course will emphasize the potential administrative enforcement, civil and criminal exposure of both regulated entities and individuals involved within those industries.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 961
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The rights, duties, and remedies of both debtor and creditor are examined. The course covers the collection process, enforcement of money judgments, and insolvency proceedings. Federal bankruptcy law is emphasized.

Prerequisites:
None
TAX 949
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the basic substantive provisions of the federal income tax law. Included are the following general topics: gross income, exclusions, deductions, depreciation, basis, tax accounting, and other provisions affecting situations encountered by attorneys in general practice.

Prerequisites:
None
HLTHL 961
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The course will focus on the laws governing ethical issues that arise in the course of providing medical care and ensuring public health. Specific topics include treatment at the end of life, reproductive rights, organ transplantation, genetic testing, human experimentation, and infectious disease control and prevention. A central theme is the conflict between patients interests and the interests of others and/or societal interests. This course also explores the intersection of ethics and economics in terms of the social right to care and the rationing of limited medical resources.

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 973
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will provide students a comprehensive understanding of the legal issues posed by developments in genetic technologies. The course will provide an overview of the history and technical foundations of the field and examine the legal dimensions of biotechnology. Generally, the course will examine how the law reacts to legal problems that arise from new technologies and examine whether the law is capable of anticipating such problems and acting prospectively.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 964
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course first focuses on various topics that are important in M&A transactions involving both closely-held and publicly-held corporations, including directors duties, shareholder voting and dissenters' rights, basic issues under the Federal securities laws, fundamentals of Federal income taxation and accounting, use of modern valuation techniques, including DCF and CAPM, in M&A, and basic issues in antitrust and pre-merger notification. The course then turns to an analysis of various forms of negotiated acquisition, including acquisitions of stock and assets of closely-held corporations and acquisitions of publicly-held corporations in negotiated transactions. The course is based on the first half of Thompson, Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions: Corporate, Securities, Tax, Antitrust, International, and Related Aspects (2008).

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 963 Corporations
CCLAW 965
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course builds on the topics covered in Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisition I, and is based on the second half of Thompson, Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions: Corporate, Securities, Tax, Antitrust, International, and Related Aspects (2008). The course starts with an examination of leveraged buyouts, and then focuses on the drafting of various types of acquisition agreements. The course then looks at proxy contests and then turns to hostile takeovers and going private transactions regulated by the Williams Act provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The course then looks at special topics in M&A, including spinoffs, international M&A, bank acquisitions, acquisitions of public utilities, bankruptcy acquisitions, joint ventures and ethics issues in M&A.

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 964 Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions I
CCLAW 958
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Selected practical problems involving the planning of business transactions, with emphasis upon the small business enterprise, are examined. Topics include: organization of close corporations, partnerships and LLCs; employee compensation; sexual harassment and discrimination issues; executive hiring negotiations; and raising capital through the sale of securities. This course is strongly suggested for anyone who plans on representing businesses.

Prerequisites:
TAX 949 Basic Federal Income Taxation , CCLAW 963 Corporations strongly recommended
Faculty:
CCLAW 959
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is a study of the law governing the reorganization of businesses under chapter 11 and related provisions of the U.S. bankruptcy code. It includes such topics as prepetition planning, the filing of a business reorganization case (either voluntary or involuntary), jurisdiction and venue, the automatic stay and “adequate protection,” the bankruptcy estate, “first day” orders, use of cash collateral, postpetition financing, wage payment orders, rights of utilities, reclamation rights, executory contracts, employment and payment of professionals, professional responsibility in the bankruptcy context, creditors’ (and other) committees, chapter 11 trustees and examiners, substantive consolidation, chapter 11 plans and disclosure statements, plan confirmation, claims objections, avoidance actions, coordination of international insolvency cases.

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 961 Bankruptcy or CCLAW 952 Secured Transactions
IHIMM 995A
Credits:
5
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The course component of the Center teaches students the skills necessary to be effective immigration advocates and attorneys. Principally through representation of organizations, students will work on innovative advocacy and policy projects relating to U.S. immigration policy and immigrants’ rights. Students should expect to put in as much time as is required to complete project work successfully, which will be an average of twenty hours per week. Working primarily in teams, students will build professional relationships with government and non-governmental policy makers, academics, individual clients, and others. Students earn 5 credits and are limited to one semester of enrollment. Visit the Center for Immigrants’ Rights Clinic for more information.

Prerequisites:
INTER 965 Immigration Law or INTER 961 Asylum & Refugee Law, Faculty Approval Required
IHCAD 995A
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The course will provide instruction to students in the legal representation of children in various civil matters, including dependency, adoption and custody actions. Students will be managing a caseload of clients. Students will meet directly with their clients, and correspond with agencies and opposing counsel. Students will appear at all court appearances with a supervising attorney. The supervising attorney will meet with students individually on a regular basis for case reviews. The classroom component of the course will focus on various substantive and skills issues, including lectures on child interviewing skills and lectures from physicians on the medical aspects of child abuse, etc. The students will also review legislative and policy issues related to children's advocacy. Students earn 4 credits. Visit the Children's Advocacy Clinic for more information.

Prerequisites:
CRIML 974 Juvenile Law, Faculty approval required.
INTER 974
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The most important issue of Civil Law today is its Worldview and its perspectives on Citizenship as well as on International Justice. In other words, particularities of the Civil Law sustain a worldview that stems from Roman Law-traditions and practices of the Roman Empire. These pertain to more recent legal developments taking place in a unifying Europe. The profiles of the major functionaries in today's Civil Law domain: judges, attorneys, EU civil servants and administrators mirror such traditions. This Course is not restricted to a traditional comparative perspective. Means are provided for a correct and effective transnational communication between legal professionals. To study Civil Law and EU Law implies an approach, understanding and management of the electronic means to communicate with its citizens, institutions and courts. The EU website is an outstanding instrument to understand the structures within lawyers must operate. Where also Common Law lawyers have to direct themselves to EU Civil Law colleagues and counterparts, they should possess knowledge and skills to understand and exercise to manage that website. The Course introduces into the basic principles and skills of the site.

Prerequisites:
None
CL&CR 956
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the protection of individual rights afforded by the Constitution by analyzing litigation involving violations of individual rights by the government and its officers. The principal substantive areas addressed are prisoners' rights, police misconduct, and political surveillance. In the process of examining the substantive civil rights issues, the course will analyze advanced concepts of civil procedure, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction, and trial practice.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SKILS 997B Spring 2014
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr:N

Disposition before trial occurs in a vast majority of civil lawsuits (e.g., 98% of federal cases), making pre-trial advocacy the dominant part of legal practice at most law firms and agencies. Prior to entering the courtroom, most junior attorneys will cut their legal teeth on pre-trial activities and motions practice. This course will combine elements of core curriculum courses, legal writing, and experiential learning by engaging students with a real and robust fact pattern requiring research and analysis leading to written pre-trial advocacy including pleadings, discovery and disclosures, motions (procedural, substantive, and dispositive), negotiation and settlement documents. Paralleling an actual case through complex civil litigation, this “in-context” course will provide students with insight into the process of preparing a case for trial or, more likely, bettering the client’s position for a pre-trial disposition.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
LL.M. students permitted to enroll with Faculty Approval.
CORE 900
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Civil Procedure concerns the rules and principles that govern the litigation of a civil case. The course addresses systemic issues related to how and where a lawsuit is filed, including: personal and subject matter jurisdiction; venue; the notice required once a lawsuit has been filed; and which substantive law-state or federal-should apply in federal court. The course also familiarizes the student with the stages of a lawsuit, including: pleading; structuring the lawsuit; discovery; termination of a lawsuit without trial; trial; and actions that may be taken after a jury verdict or bench trial. Although reference is made to state laws, the course concentrates on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

Prerequisites:
None
IHAPP 995
Credits:
--
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This clinical offering will provide exposure to drafting merits and amicus briefs in non-criminal civil rights cases in the state courts, federal appellate courts, and the United States Supreme Court. Cases may derive from various sources, such as civil rights advocacy organizations, Third Circuit pro bono referrals and from PSU-Dickinson School of Law professors. In addition to brief preparation, students will participate in identifying potential cases for the clinic, case selection and the development of appropriate appellate strategy.

This offering will provide intensive training in appellate advocacy by involving students in non criminal civil rights cases before the state appellate courts, federal courts of appeal and the United States Supreme Court. Students will assist in case selection, the development of substantive legal positions, provide research, assist in appellate strategy development and draft briefs. As this as a new clinical offering an initial focus will be on amicus briefs, however the driving decision for case selection will be which cases, during any particular clinic session, offer the best pedagogical value. In working on these cases students will have exposure to top civil rights and appellate litigators in the country. In addition to this work, there will be classroom sessions which will be augmented by presentations by experts in the field and attendance at oral arguments when appropriate. Visit the Civil Rights Appellate Clinic for more information.

Prerequisites:
LABOR 964 Employment Discrimination or Related Civil Rights Courses and a Demonstrated Interest in Appellate Work. Faculty approval required.
Faculty:
SEM 916
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar explores the class action device, tracing its historical origins from the earliest forms of aggregate litigation through various amendments to Rule 23 and passage of the Class Action Fairness Act. Although other non-class aggregation techniques are discussed, they are addressed only for comparative purposes. The unique nature of representative litigation and the special issues that arise during the course of a class action are the subject of discussion and student presentations during seminar sessions. Considerable discussion is devoted to the roles of the various "players" in a class action: the qualifications of the class representative, the qualifications and interest of class counsel, and the fiduciary role of the district judge.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 957
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course introduces students to the dynamics of a productive attorney-client relationship, the goals of interviewing and counseling, and structures and techniques that can be used to achieve those goals. The focus is on developing students' skills in interviewing and counseling. Instruction consists of assigned reading, problem-solving exercises, group discussion, and practice through simulations.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 967
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of modern commercial litigation. We do this by following a single commercial case (tried in D. Del. in 2008) from pre-complaint investigation through trial. Using the actual case materials, we examine all the major strategic and tactical decisions, from both the plaintiff's and defendant's perspective, in all phases of the case, including the complaint, motion to dismiss, fact discovery, expert reports, summary judgment, settlement discussions, jury focus groups, Daubert motions, final pretrial conference, and trial.
Prerequisites:
None
INTPR 950
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course will explore current issues in communications law including First Amendment constraints on the regulation of the content of telephone calls and television advertising, cable TV monopolies, and telecommunications regulations and deregulation. Course materials explore regulatory, constitutional, and antitrust law principles as they apply to broadcast, cable, and telecommunications activities.

Prerequisites:
None
IHCLC 995
Credits:
--
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

A general civil litigation clinic, which includes various forms of mediation, negotiation, etc., in addition to civil hearings and traditional courtroom litigation. Due to the litigation component of this clinic, it will serve only students residing in Carlisle. Areas of law which students will be exposed to include: divorce, custody, support, protection from abuse, adoption, social security and supplemental security income claims, guardianships, special education, American with Disabilities Act claims, civil rights actions, and health care directives. Cases will be selected based on educational value to students and expertise of the clinical faculty. Students who select a family law emphasis in their clinic work will enroll in the Family Law course as a pre- or co-requisite. Students who select a disability law emphasis in their clinic work will enroll in the Disability Law course as a pre- or co-requisite. Preference will be given to students who have already taken either course.

Prerequisites:
FMEST 962 Family Law or SEM 926 Law and Individuals with Disabilities Seminar depending on student area of concentration. Faculty approval required.
INTER 968
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course focuses on the antitrust law of the European Union and selected other jurisdictions. It will cover international mergers, monopolies, price fixing cartels, distribution restraints, and related topics. The course examines principles of comity and cooperation among international enforcers investigating cases with a multi-national impact. We also review the antitrust laws of other selected jurisdictions, focusing on proposed and recently enacted competition laws including those of selected new entrants to the European Union and China, and on laws of other jurisdictions with an important impact on U.S. firms such as Japan. Finally, the course will consider issues such as advising multi-national clients, obtaining discovery internationally, and litigating complex cases.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 958
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The principal objective of this course is to provide students with a greater understanding of how their country's body of constitutional law is shaped by history, institutions, and current values. The comparative project, by focusing on narrow differences between two very similar countries, allows students to move beyond an acceptance of basic premises of constitutional law as "natural" or "inherent." As an important dividend, students will gain basic knowledge of foundational concepts in the legal landscape of their country's largest trading partner, hopefully providing students with a comparative advantage in seeking employment with government offices and private firms whose clients engage in substantial cross-border transactions.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SEM 997A Fall 2014
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar, taught via AV with students at the University of Montreal, explores constitutional law differences in the US, Canada, Australia, and South Africa.  The focus is on differences in history, legal and political institution, and current values that may explain different doctrinal paths.

* Special topic course

 

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
TAX 951
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course treats the unique problems of Home country taxation of the foreign income and operations of resident persons and enterprises and Host country taxation of foreign persons and enterprises. Topics include the treatment of cross-border business and investment; sales, financing and e-commerce; the source of income; worldwide and territorial taxation; methods for the elimination of double taxation including foreign tax credits, exemption, and treaties; controlled foreign corporations; tax avoidance; and value added taxes. While stressing the law of the United States and the European Union, this course broadly examines the tax law of both developed and emerging economies to gain a better understanding of the impact of taxation internationally.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 908
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar gives students experience in researching, drafting and orally presenting an in-depth comparative scholarly work product. Early in the seminar, in consultation with the professor, students identify and select a timely and important topic which will serve as the subject of their Seminar research paper. Each student’s research and written drafts are subject to ongoing review and critique by the professor and student colleagues throughout the Semester. When completed, each research paper is presented orally to the Seminar at the end of the course. The comparative research and drafting exercises sensitize students to the civil law tradition and contemporary national and supranational legal systems in Europe and around the world that have grown out of or have been substantially influenced by the civil law tradition. Students also develop client counseling skills.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 958
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

How do we resolve problems when the substantive law or procedural rules of states or nations conflict? For example, if Hawaii enacts a statute permitting same-sex marriages, must other states recognize such a marriage? If an American-owned factory explodes in India, may the injured pursue claims under American tort law? The course will provide a review of jurisdictional concepts introduced earlier in first-year courses, introduce choice of law issues for multistate or multinational transactions or events, and examine the influence of the U.S. Constitution on the reach of a state's judicial decisions or legislation outside the state.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SEM 945
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar will examine the law and procedures governing congressional investigations through a series of case studies. Case study topics will include the Teapot Dome scandal, the 1929 stock market crash Pecora hearings, the House Un-America Activities and Senate McCarthy committees, Watergate, Iran-Contra, and Whitewater, as well as an examination of special investigative commissions which will include the Roberts Commission's investigation of the Pearl Harbor attack, the Warren Commission's investigation of President Kennedy's assassination, and the 9-11 Commission's investigation of the 9-11 terrorist attacks. These case studies will be the vehicles for studying the substantive law and legal procedures that govern the conduct of congressional investigations, including congressional subpoena power and its limits, privileges available to witnesses, testimonial immunity grants, assertions of executive privilege, contempt sanctions, perjury and false statements sanctions, and the role of counsel in congressional investigations.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CORE 903
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The course examines the roles of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches in determining limits of national and state powers and protection of the individual and civil rights provided in the United States Constitution.

Prerequisites:
None
CL&CR 963
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course studies the development of equal protection law under the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments, the state action issue, and the free exercise and establishment clauses of the First Amendment.

Prerequisites:
None
RP&EL 980
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the peculiar legal problems encountered on construction projects. It covers contract, tort and statutory law as adapted specifically to the construction industry. It analyzes the perspectives of an owner, developer, architect/engineer, contractor, subcontractor and bonding company, both in the context of private and public construction projects, commercial and residential. The principal areas of inquiry are contract structure, public bidding, theories of liability, payment and security mechanisms, claims related to time, disruption and extra work, and claims arising from construction defects. This course is designed to enable you to become familiar with construction law and the construction industry so that, whether you work in the public sector or private practice, you will be able to offer practical legal advice to construction professionals.

Prerequisites:
None
CORE 905
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Contracts is concerned with the formation of contracts. The traditional offer and acceptance are analyzed in light of problems presented by modern bargaining techniques. Voidability of contracts formed by fraud, mistake, illegality, and unconscionable advantage is also stressed. The performance of contracts and the parol evidence rule are discussed.

Prerequisites:
None
INTPR 960
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The course addresses the legal protection afforded to authors and artists under common law and statutory copyright. It considers the rights granted, procedure for their procurement, and protection through litigation. The course also deals with international rights, conveyancing, and interface with the antitrust laws.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 997B Spring 2014
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will provide students with an intensive examination of Delaware corporate governance law as applied to corporate merger and asset acquisition strategy and transactions. NOTE: Because of overlap in course content, students who took Business Planning for Mergers and Acquisitions I (CCLAW 964) with Professor Chertok Spring 2013 may not take this course.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 963 Corporations
TAX 991
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course focuses primarily on income tax problems unique to corporations and the income tax problems arising from the shareholder-corporate relationship.

Prerequisites:
TAX 949 Basic Federal Income Taxation
TAX 997A Spring 2012
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course focuses primarily on income tax problems unique to corporations and the income tax problems arising from the shareholder-corporate relationship.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
TAX 949 Basic Federal Income Taxation
CCLAW 963
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course primarily addresses organization and operation of commercial organizations in the Anglo-American community. Preliminarily, sole proprietorships and partnerships are considered, after which corporations-for-profit are emphasized with some attention to business trusts and non-profit corporations. In the corporate context, duties of promoters, directors, officers, and other insiders are considered. Availability in the U.S. of the derivative action is treated in terms of both unincorporated and corporate forms of organization. Also treated are the basics of securities regulation at the federal and state levels in the U.S. and the provincial level in Canada.

Prerequisites:
None
CORE 910
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course deals with what is called substantive criminal law, i.e., crimes. Numerous crimes such as homicide, theft, and conspiracy are examined, and defenses such as self-defense and insanity are scrutinized. A primary focus of the course is the utilization and interpretation of criminal statutes.

Prerequisites:
None
CORE 907
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Criminal Procedure explores part of the interface between the criminal justice system and the United States Constitution. It introduces students to constitutional analysis by examining key provisions of the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments as they apply to police investigation and interrogation as well as to the circumstances under which indigent defendants are guaranteed the assistance of counsel.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 910
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar will focus on two different themes. It will explore what it means to be a lawyer in the United States in comparison with what it means to be a lawyer in other countries. Among other things, participants will discuss the lawyer's role in society and the type of conduct that is regulated. This course will also examine the cross-border practice regulation that has emerged in response to the increasingly common circumstance of lawyers who handle a matter in a country other than their own.

Prerequisites:
For J.D. students: CORE 934 Professional Responsibility (may also be taken concurrently)
Faculty:
SEM997A Fall 2013
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar will explore the statutory and constitutional rules regarding implementation of the death penalty in the United States. The course will begin with a brief discussion of arguments by proponents and opponents of the death penalty. We will then address the development of Eighth and Fourteenth Amendment restrictions on the use of capital punishment, including categorical exemptions from the death penalty for the insane, the mentally retarded, juveniles, certain felony-murderers, and those who do not commit homicide. Next, we will look at issues surrounding the execution itself, including competency to be executed and the use of lethal injection and other methods of execution. We will examine the unique hallmarks of capital litigation including: the selection of a “death qualified” jury; the use of aggravating and mitigating factors, and victim impact evidence; the special guidance given to capital jurors; effective assistance of counsel in the capital context; procedural rights at sentencing; and the vexing issue of death penalty “volunteers.” The prominent issue of race and its relation to the death penalty will also be addressed. Traditional class discussion will be supplemented with in-class exercises in which students take on the roles of prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, and state legislators.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 909
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar is for students who: have closely examined at least one dispute resolution system (e.g., civil or criminal litigation, administrative adjudication, investment treaty arbitration, contractual tiered systems for the provision of negotiation, mediation and arbitration); seek to gain an empirically-grounded understanding of the lifecycle and dynamics of conflict, conflict resolution and the pursuit of justice; and will use such understanding to propose the creation or reform of a public, private or hybrid dispute resolution system. Students will conduct original legal and (if possible) empirical research, using the principles, theories, research and dispute system law and procedure studied in the seminar. The following are examples of courses that should be sufficient to prepare students for this seminar: Advocacy I (SKILS 950), The U.S. Law of Arbitration (SKILS 962), Negotiation/Mediation (SKILS 960), International Commercial Arbitration (INTER 984), Federal Courts (SKILS 965), Administrative Law (GOVMT 952) or other courses that include substantial coverage of dispute system law and procedure.

Prerequisites:
None, however prior coursework in dispute system law and procedure is highly recommended as noted above.
INTER 978
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr:N

In a globalized world, international economic order is defined, to a large extent, by legal frameworks and rules-based regimes governing various aspects of cross-border exchange. These frameworks and regimes are shaped, in their creation and subsequent evolution, by the relative distribution of power among states. At the same time, these frameworks and regimes can affect the distribution of power among states in important ways.

Dynamics of International Economic Order examines the cross-cutting relationship between political power and global economic governance. To this end, the course considers three inter-related sets of issues: first, how nation-states define international economic order through the creation of legal frameworks and rules-based regimes for cross-border trade, investment, and monetary relations; second, how shifts in the international distribution of economic and political power impact these frameworks and regimes; and third, how great powers—in the contemporary context more specifically, the United States (the emblematic established power) and China (the paradigmatic rising power)—approach global economic governance as part of their grand strategies to advance their interests and enhance their international position.

 

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
PERSP 982
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will introduce students to the economic analysis of law and legal issues. No prior training in economics is assumed, though students with such training are welcome to enroll. Students will be instructed in the nature of economic reasoning and will learn to use fundamental principles of economics to explain legal doctrines and solve legal problems. The course will focus primarily on a positive analysis, investigating whether legal doctrines can best be explained as attempts to promote efficiency, and only secondarily on the normative question of whether the law ought to promote efficiency. After a brief survey of microeconomics, the course will address the major common law areas of property, contracts, torts, and criminal law as well as the legal process. Students will learn how fundamental economic concepts, such as transactions costs, externalities, and risk allocation, can help explain the logic of these large bodies of law, difference among them, and long-standing principles of each. Depending on the pace of coverage, the course may cover topics in other areas, such as corporations and family law.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SEM 911
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course covers the basic premises of compulsory education; issues concerning exclusion of students; school control of student behavior and curriculum; teacher employment problems; and issues of funding, minority rights, and school liability.

Prerequisites:
None
FMEST 963
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course presents a survey of the legal issues associated with aging, including introduction to national and global demographics on population aging; comparative policies on Social Security; quality of health care, including care under Medicare and Medicaid (and alternative forms of payment systems for health care and long term care); age discrimination in employment; housing for older adults, including nursing homes, assisted living and continuing care facilities; advance health care decision making; and fiduciary duties of agents and family members.

Prerequisites:
None
GOVMT 954
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course covers federal and state election law and will examine the constitutional basis for the regulation of elections, the development of the law in this area over the last 30 years, as well as criminal and civil enforcement of the law, the role of the Federal Election Commission, the formation and regulation of political action committees, as well as related federal tax law provisions impacting operation of political committees and advocacy organizations. The course will also examine the intersection of the election law with congressional ethics rules, lobbying regulations and representation of political candidates and entities in election law matters.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SEM 969
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The seminar will cover the case law, procedural rules, evidence rules, and rules of professional conduct implicated by the unique attributes of information created and/or stored electronically, as well as the filing and courtroom presentation of documents in electronic format. There are three components to the course. The first part concerns the discovery of ESI, and covers the nature, sources, and terminology of ESI; the different formats of ESI and the implications for preservation and production of ESI attributable to the different formats; the evolution of the rules and case law regarding discovery of ESI; and the obligations of counsel with respect to the preservation of ESI.

Prerequisites:
None
CORE 902
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Elements of Law orients students to legal research and reasoning through caselaw, statutory interpretation, and legal history, processes, and institutions. The course covers topics across many substantive areas of law, and addresses legal methodology as it arises in the legal profession.

Prerequisites:
None
TAX 960
Credits:
2-3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course introduces students to the law governing employer-provided benefit programs. It will begin with a look at the early development of welfare and pension plans offered through the workplace. The course will examine closely the landmark Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA) and its subsequent amendments. Among topics to be covered will be defined benefit and defined contribution pension programs. This will include a survey of rules relating to pension taxation, vesting, funding, alienability, guaranty, and fiduciary duties. With respect to health insurance, the course will look at issues affecting both employee and retiree health programs, including collectively bargained ones. The course will also discuss the subjects of age discrimination in employee benefit programs as well as ERISA preemption.

Prerequisites:
None
LABOR 964
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will provide an overview of significant doctrinal issues in employment discrimination law, and will seek to develop students' skills through a rigorous examination of statutory law, regulations and court decisions. It will introduce students to the fundamental legal theories underlying the substantive coverage of the most significant federal equal employment opportunity laws, and legal issues regarding their application.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
PERSP 952
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course is the introductory course in the regulation of energy in the United States. It also considers some of the international impact of U.S. energy policy. The course examines each significant form of energy (oil, natural gas, nuclear power, electricity, coal and renewables) in terms of the manner in which each form is regulated by various government institutions. To understand the various forms of regulation, we will also consider a substantial amount of economic, political and socio/psychological information. Each segment of the course will be presented in terms of specific problems that participating students will help analyze and solve. At each stage of the course, we will consider the current policies and attempt to develop regulatory goals and positions that will improve those policies. The syllabus for this course is designed to avoid significant overlap with the course in oil and gas law and the course in energy, international security and the global economy.

 

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
INTER 979
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course explores the economic, political, and strategic implications of ongoing trends and structural shifts in global energy markets. It focuses especially on international markets for crude oil and natural gas; attention is also devoted to nuclear energy, the international nuclear industry, and nonproliferation challenges. Students will develop a deep appreciation of the role of energy, and especially hydrocarbon-based energy, in contemporary international affairs. They will learn about the historical development and evolution of hydrocarbon-based energy and the international oil and gas industry; about the various types of contractual arrangements for cross-border investment in upstream oil and gas development and what the differences among these types of agreements reflect regarding the shifting balance of power between resource-owning national governments and foreign investors; and about why and how major energy market players shape their interactions on the basis of political and strategic calculations, along with commercial and economic considerations. They will also learn about the economic and political factors affecting the contribution of nuclear energy to the global energy balance; about the major proliferation risks associated with civil nuclear technology; and about the international regime that has been developed to mitigate these risks and the most pressing challenges to this regime.

 

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
RP&EL 960
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course introduces some of the most important concepts, issues, and statutes in environmental law. After discussing the economic and ethical bases for environmental law and briefly reviewing the relevant principles of constitutional and common law, students examine a representative selection of federal statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, "Superfund," and the Clean Air Act.

Prerequisites:
None
RP&EL 962
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course explores the various aspects of litigation, client counseling, and regulatory work that arise in the day to day practice of environmental law. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of the practice of law, with active class participation using problems designed to duplicate situations faced by environmental attorneys in their practices. Among other things, students will cross-examine scientific experts, prepare a plant manager for a deposition, and negotiate a civil penalty for environmental violations. Although environmental law is used a basis for the mock exercises, prior environmental classes are not a prerequisite , and the skills taught in this course will translate well to other types of litigation.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 997A Fall 2011
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Major environmental issues with considerable controversy, uncertainty, or immediacy will be examined in detail (climate change, pandemic flu virus, major natural disaster, etc.). After six weeks of detailed study in the substance of the topics and the decision making process in the international community a simulation game will be conducted based on one of the topics. Teams of students will take on the roles of nations, groups of nations, or extranational organizations (for example USA, China, India, Russia, EU, Group of 77, OPEC, UN, WHO, etc.). They will develop positions based on the most current scientific information and existing policy. The game will progress through a series of moves to which they must respond with new policy positions. These will be the result of real and plausible changes scientific knowledge, economic and environmental conditions, technology, and international power relationships. The game will take approximately five weeks. In addition to content knowledge on the environmental topics; existing laws, treaties, and agreements; and international organizations; students participating in the simulation game will get experience in rapid ingest of data, analysis, negotiations, presentation techniques, preparation of analytical briefs, and leadership under pressure, much like the real world. The results of the game will then be debriefed and deconstructed, and critically analyzed to gain insights into both the issue and how various interested parties or groups will likely be affected and how they might respond.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 997A Fall 2012
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

With dramatic changes sweeping across the Arab world, the role of Islam is once again an international issue. In the West, Islamic civilization and law is often approached with distrust and suspicion. Consider a recent proposal for an Oklahoma Constitutional amendment barring the use of Sharia (Islamic) law in secular courts. Yet, despite this widespread bias, Americans know little about Sharia law. Turning to Judeo-Christian legal traditions, the contemporary American attitude is more conflicted. A pervasive liberal ethos increasingly expresses skepticism about the role of faith in the public square. At the same time, many Americans espouse religious beliefs, and view religion as essential to their modern identity. A recent Supreme Court decision (Van Orden, regarding a public display of the Decalogue) has even affirmed the Judeo-Christian foundation of American law. Nevertheless, Americans also know little about Halakha (Jewish) and Canon (Christian) law.

This course aims to fill this gap by exploring essential themes in Jewish, Christian and Islamic jurisprudence. Evaluating similarities and differences among these Abrahamic legal traditions, the course will examine the following questions: Is law central to these respective religions, and if so, in what manner? What are their respective attitudes to revelation, sacred texts and oral traditions? How much autonomy are humans granted to interpret and adapt sacral law? What is the relationship of law to the state and power? Beginning with a selection of modern religious laws, this course will return to the roots of these religious legal traditions and chart their historical developments. Focusing on each religion, but also mindful of comparative dimensions, the course will underscore seminal legal doctrines and principles of all three legal traditions. Finally, the course will conclude with several case studies analyzing how these religious legal systems approach specific substantive issues (e.g., topics in family and customary law).

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
FMEST 964
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Studies the concepts and techniques required to develop estate plans. Topics include the initial client interview, drafting of wills and trusts, powers of attorney, living wills, disability planning and income taxation of trusts and estates. The psychological and ethical aspects of estate planning will be covered. The course will also survey the federal gift, estate and generation skipping taxes. The course is intended to be an introduction to estate planning, valuable to both the person intending to specialize in the field and the general practitioner.

Prerequisites:
FMEST 960 Trusts and Estates and TAX 949 Basic Federal Income Taxation
SEM 913
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar examines the main elements of European Union (EU) law. It covers the institutional structure of the EU and its law-making process and compares it with US government and federalism. It explores the judicial architecture of the EU and the role of the European Court of Justice. It looks at the legal framework covering EU inter-state trade, corporate mobility, and free movement of persons within the EU. It also examines trade between the EU and third states, in particular the US, and foreign relations law of the EU.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 955
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course presents evidence in trials under the Federal Rules of Evidence, at common law and in equity and with reference to administrative bodies. The reasoning from which rules arise in areas including relevancy, competency, privilege, examination of witnesses, writing, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, burden of proof, presumptions, judicial notice, and constitutional evidence problems is also addressed.

Prerequisites:
None
FPEXT 995
Credits:
3
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

Externship Placements offer students the opportunity to work and learn in a variety of settings outside the Law School under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. Placements are in public service or nonprofit offices, including local, state and federal government and judicial offices. Students work with experienced supervisors in those offices to develop skills in legislative drafting, opinion writing, client counseling, research, administrative and criminal practice, statutory analysis and interpretation, and application and enforcement of regulations. Through their work and class discussions, students are expected to develop a heightened awareness of the methods and functions of the legislative, regulatory, judicial, and public interest representation functions.

Available placements include state cabinet level agencies, state and federal judicial chambers, legal services offices, legislative offices, local governments, Penn State offices, and state prosecutor and public defender offices. More detailed information on our Externship Placement program can be found on our Externships page.

Students may not register for this course until they have secured an approved placement and obtained the permission of the faculty supervisor.

Prerequisites:
Law School Faculty Supervisor approval is required before registering. In addition, individual offices may establish requirements, such as completion of relevant courses, completion of a minimum number of semesters, or status as a certified legal intern
FPIJP 995
Credits:
10
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

The International Justice Externship Program will provide students with the opportunity to spend a semester at the Hague in the Netherlands earning 10 hours of academic credit for approximately 30 hours of supervised work. Students will work in the Office of the Special Prosecutor at the Hague. The externship will enable students to pursue advanced practical training and research opportunities in international criminal law beyond our curricular offerings. Students will have the opportunity to analyze sophisticated areas of international law in a real world context. Each student participating in the Hague semester is required to enroll in a concurrent two-credit seminar. The seminar component will address international trial investigative techniques, tribunal jurisdiction and procedure, and areas of international civil and criminal law that are most relevant to legal practice before international tribunals. Highlights of the course may include analysis of the prosecutions of Slobodan Milosevic, former President, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Milan Lukic, former head of a paramilitary group called the White Eagles, and Jovica Stanisic, the former head of the State Security Service in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

Students must register for the 2-credit seminar, International Justice Seminar (SEM 943), the same semester as the International Justice Externship Program (FPIJP 995).

Prerequisites:
Student must have completed and earned at least a C in Professional Responsibility before participating in the externship. In addition, students must have taken at least one of the following courses: International Law (INTER 971), Introduction to Transnational Law and Legal Issues (INTER 951), The Supreme Court in Comparative Perspective (SEM 907); History of International Law Seminar (SEM 903); International Protection of Human Rights Seminar (SEM 922); International Uniform Enforcement of Human Rights Seminar (SEM 968); The United Nations and International Law Seminar (SEM 941); Comparative Law in a Globalized World Seminar (SEM 908); or equivalent course approved by program advisor.
Faculty:
FPHBG 995
Credits:
8
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

The Semester in Harrisburg Program is an 8-credit, semester long internship that provides experiential learning relating to legislative and administrative law practice and the formulation of public policy at the state government level. Enrollment is open to students in their third year of law school, and the 8-credit internship is graded credit/no credit. Internship placements must be approved by the Program directors and are in the state legislature, in state government agencies and offices, and with nonprofit groups that focus on state government affairs and administrative agencies. The purpose of the program is to provide students advanced training and research opportunities in a specialized area of law of interest to them and to serve as an intensive “capstone semester” for coursework already completed at the law school.

Students must register for the 1-credit contemporaneous guided reflection course (FPHBG 996) during the semester that they participate in the Semester in Harrisburg Program. This course will require a twenty-page research paper and will be graded as credit/no credit.

Students in the program must enroll in GOVMT 987 State and Local Government Law when offered the same semester as the internship semester. In any semester in which GOVMT 987 State and Local Government Law course is not offered students in the program must enroll in a required relevant elective course approved by the program directors, and selected from an approved list of courses in the law school curriculum, and relevant to the placement organization.

Prerequisites:
Student must have completed and earned at least a C in Professional Responsibility before participating in the externship.
FPWDC 995
Credits:
10
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

The Washington semester externship will provide students with the opportunity to spend a semester in Washington, D.C. earning 10 hours of academic credit for approximately 32 hours of supervised work. Students will work in one of several selected and approved governmental or nonprofit entities.

The externship will enable students to pursue advanced training and research opportunities in a particular field beyond our curricular offerings. The areas of law will include federal criminal law, international law, federal civil regulatory agency practice and procedure, and public and private nonprofit law. Students will have the opportunity to analyze sophisticated areas of law in a real world context. In the classroom component students will analyze the legal obligations and professional responsibilities of both government lawyers and private counsel.

Students must register for Federal Regulatory and Legislative Practice Seminar (SEM 914) – 2 credits the same semester as the Washington D.C. Externship Placement. The seminar will utilize a separation of powers analysis to examine federal regulatory and legislative practice. Topics covered will include congressional investigations, federal regulatory agency jurisdiction and procedure, and areas of federal criminal law that are most relevant to legal practice in Washington, DC. The seminar's primary focus will be those areas of Washington legal practice in which administrative and regulatory law, federal criminal law, politics, and public relations intersect to create special problems and challenges for attorneys in government and private practice. A "case study" approach will be used to analyze these topics from both perspectives, examining the legal obligations and professional responsibilities of both government lawyers and private counsel. Highlights of the course include analysis of the Watergate, ABSCA, Iran-Contra, Whitewater, and Clinton-Lewinsky scandals.

Prerequisites:
Student must have completed and earned at least a C in Professional Responsibility before participating in the externship.
FMEST 962
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course studies legal problems pertaining to the organization, operation, and dissolution of the family. It includes material on privacy, alternative families, marriage and annulment, child and spousal support, termination of parental rights, adoption and care of the child, divorce, alimony, property distribution at divorce, and custody of children.

Prerequisites:
None
IHFAM 995B
Credits:
5
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

In this clinic, up to seven students per semester represent indigent clients and domestic abuse victims in family law cases. All cases are in the Court of Common Pleas of Centre County. The work includes divorce, child support, spousal support, custody/visitation, domestic violence, and related matters. Students should expect to work as much time as is necessary to represent their clients successfully, which will be an average of twenty hours per week. Students also participate in a weekly clinic seminar which includes skills training, theoretical examination of clinical work, and case rounds. Each student also meets individually with the clinic supervisor to discuss their case work and their progress in the clinic. Only third-year law students are admitted in the Fall Semester. Students earn 5 graded credits. Visit the Family Law Clinic for more information.

Prerequisites:
FMEST 962 Family Law and SKILS 955 Evidence. CORE 934 Professional Responsibility is recommended. Faculty approval required.
Faculty:
SKILS 967
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course introduces contemporary issues in several topical areas of particular interest to litigating in federal courts. The course topics are varied, with the unifying theme being that each topic possesses either particular prominence or exclusive jurisdiction within the country’s federal court system. These topics include: the history and organization of the federal courts, the courts’ relationship with Congress, the arguments for and against diversity jurisdiction, the practical dynamics of federal procedure, strategic considerations involved in a litigant’s choice of federal court, ADR proceedings in federal courts, securities, bankruptcy, intellectual property, antitrust, employment discrimination, review of administrative agency decisions, immigration issues, federal criminal matters, sentencing, civil rights cases, and habeas.

Prerequisites:
SKILS 965 Federal Courts and SKILS 955 Evidence are recommended but not required
SKILS 965
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course involves elements of constitutional law and civil procedure, addressing the relationship of federal courts to administrative agencies, state courts and private and ad hoc dispute resolution forums (e.g., arbitration, mediation, 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund). Building on the foundational knowledge of federal subject matter jurisdiction addressed in Civil Procedure, this course examines in greater detail advanced problems in standing, mootness, and ripeness. Building on the foundational knowledge of separation of powers and federalism addressed in Constitutional Law, this course examines the power of Congress to allocate judicial power among federal courts, federal agencies, and States. The heart of the course, however, consists of advanced topics including the power of federal courts to create common law, limitations (and complications) in suits against the federal and state governments and their officials, problems arising when administrative agencies or state courts are addressing matters related to the subject of a pending case in federal court, and limitations on federal appellate jurisdiction. This course should prove especially useful to students who anticipate clerking for a federal or state judge, or who plan to litigate before federal or state courts, administrative agencies, arbitral forums or other private or ad hoc dispute resolution entities.

Prerequisites:
None
CRIML 952
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is an in-depth examination of all stages of a federal criminal prosecution, commencing with the decision to charge, and continuing through trial and sentencing. Subjects will include the Bail Reform Act of 1984, investigative techniques, motions to suppress, immunity, privileges, trial techniques, and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. Strategic decisions involving pre-trial proceedings, trials, and sentencing will be addressed via presentations by experienced judges, practitioners, and other participants in the process. The goal of the course is to provide students with practical advice and insightful tops regarding every aspect of federal criminal litigation.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 914
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The seminar will utilize a separation of powers analysis to examine federal regulatory and legislative practice. Topics covered will include congressional investigations, federal regulatory agency jurisdiction and procedure, and areas of federal criminal law that are most relevant to legal practice in Washington, DC. The seminar's primary focus will be those areas of Washington legal practice in which administrative and regulatory law, federal criminal law, politics, and public relations intersect to create special problems and challenges for attorneys in government and private practice. A "case study" approach will be used to analyze these topics from both perspectives, examining the legal obligations and professional responsibilities of both government lawyers and private counsel. Highlights of the course include analysis of the Watergate, ABSCA, Iran-Contra, Whitewater, and Clinton-Lewinsky scandals.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 986
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is intended to provide an overview of the federal securities laws. Securities regulation plays a crucial role in many different fields of business law, and every lawyer should have at least a basic knowledge of its general principles. The course focuses on issues such as the offering of securities, civil liabilities connected with the sale and purchase of financial instruments, insider trading, proxy voting and M&As, takeovers, stock exchanges and brokers/dealers regulation. Specific attention is devoted to securities litigation aspects, including class actions.

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 963 Corporations
CCLAW 997E Fall 2011
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is intended to provide an overview of the federal securities laws. Securities regulation plays a crucial role in many different fields of business law, and every lawyer should have at least a basic knowledge of its general principles. The course focuses on issues such as the offering of securities, civil liabilities connected with the offer, sale and purchase of securities, the securities registration process, the structuring of transactions to avoid registration by reliance upon exemptions from registration, insider trading, proxy solicitations, and M&As, and takeovers.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 963 Corporations
CCLAW 997A Fall 2013
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

You'll learn why financial accounting is a system for measuring and communicating the outcomes of business activities to parties outside the firm. The purposes of this course are to: 1) provide you with a basic understanding of the concepts and principles (i.e. the jargon) underlying financial accounting practices. 2) make you comfortable with financial data (in particular, opening a 10K or annual report) 3) enable you to have a conversation with your company's accountants 4) make you aware of the care that must be taken when using financial accounting data as a source of information for making decisions 5) provide you with the technical tools and references to analyze how a particular transaction affects a firm's financial statements.

This course will run from August 27 (first class) through October 10 (last class). There will be a mid-term exam during the September 17 class. A final exam will be scheduled at a TBD day, date and time.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CL&CR 965
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the history, values and function of free expression, advocacy of illegal action, expression that provokes a hostile audience reaction, defamation, commercial advertising, obscenity, hate speech and pornography, expression in public places, symbolic speech, campaign finance laws, and speech in restricted environments.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
HLTHL 960
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This survey course covers the federal regulation of food, human and animal drugs, medical devices, cosmetics, biologics, and agricultural biotechnology. The primary focus will be on the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the operations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The course will also cover related statutes implemented by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the interaction between federal regulation and private tort litigation, and international trade in FDA-regulated products.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
INTER 954
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The course aims to offer thorough instruction on the role of the State in foreign economic relations, the purpose of foreign investment laws, the nature of foreign investment guarantees, the transaction aspects of foreign corporate vehicles, and the role of arbitration in settling foreign investment disputes.

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 997C Spring 2012
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

National security policy is developed, executed and sustained on a global stage where conflicts are waged live on television and daily events are shaped not just by governments communicating through traditional media but by a range of non-state actors employing Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to influence national, regional or global public opinion. This course will cover the modern national security policymaking process; the pursuit of national interests consistent with U.S. laws and values; the competing strategic narratives promoted by the U.S., emerging global powers and extremist groups such as al Qaeda; and the vital role of old and new media to the development of representative and responsible governance. Case studies in government communications and media relations will range from the Cold War and Vietnam right up to the present day, including Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantanamo, WikiLeaks and the on-going transformation of the Middle East.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 937
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar examines how DNA evidence became admissible evidence and the issues that continue to be litigated — ranging from quantifying the probative value of a DNA match, to the admissibility of "cold hits" in DNA databases, to discovery in post-conviction proceedings, to the constitutionality of acquiring DNA samples from suspects, arrestees, convicts, and medical care providers. This area of scientific evidence involves genetics and probability. Prior expertise in these subjects is not required, but a willingness to confront and master the basic scientific and statistical principles as they arise in the context of litigation is necessary.

Prerequisites:
SKILS 955 Evidence
BPREP 900
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course provides students with a substantive review of selected material routinely tested on the bar exam, primarily through problems and exercises in a bar exam format designed to familiarize students with the exam and techniques for answering multiple choice questions. Individualized feedback is provided every week to assist each student identify areas of strength and weakness. The goal is to enhance student ability to prepare for the bar exam and is intended to supplement, not replace, commercial bar preparation courses. This course is not focused an any particular state, so all students will benefit regardless of where they are sitting for the bar exam. Students enrolled in BPREP 900 are not permitted to use laptops, phones or other devices during class. This course is not recommended for students ranked in the top third of their class. BPREP 900 is graded on a pass/fail basis but is not subject in any other respect to the Pass/Fail Option.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
INTER997D Spring 2013
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course examines three related sets of issues that will substantially influence the structure of international relations in the 21st century. First, the course explores the implications of globalization for the grand strategies of great powers' in particular, the United States and rising Asian powers (with a focus on China). Second, the course looks at the Persian Gulf as one of the world's most important emerging "nodes" of economic globalization in energy, finance, and the distribution of global production across a growing number of sectors. Third, the course examines the intensifying competition for strategic influence in the Gulf between the United States, the established regional "hegemon" and rising Asian powers' especially China.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
HLTHL 997A Spring 2012
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is the second part of an introductory survey of the United States healthcare system and its legal and policy problems. The class will focus on public health and the laws governing ethical issues that arise in the course of providing medical care. Specific topics include infectious disease control and prevention, human experimentation, treatment at the end of life, reproductive rights, organ transplantation, and genetic testing.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
HLTHL 997A (Fall 2010) Health Law and Policy I: Healthcare Organization and Finance recommended but not required
HLTHL 963
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This introductory health law course will examine how the law influences the regulation, structure, financing, and delivery of healthcare in the United States. We will also consider the challenges facing healthcare providers, regulators, and consumers. Issues to be addressed include private health insurance and managed care, ERISA, COBRA, HIPAA, Medicare, Medicaid, fraud and abuse, and antitrust.

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 949
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course examines the legal issues applicable to American colleges and universities. Topics include academic freedom and tenure, affirmative action in admissions decisions, intercollegiate athletics, issues of student privacy, sexual harassment, and intellectual property.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 965
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is intended to provide students with a general knowledge of immigration law, including such critical subjects as the constitutional powers of the federal government over immigration matters, admission and exclusion, entry, deportation, and political asylum.

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 996
Credits:
1-3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

In the Independent Study course the student, under the supervision of a full-time member of the faculty, will be permitted to do research and write a paper of a substantial nature on a significant subject.

Prerequisites:
None
IHICJ 995
Credits:
5
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The Indigent Criminal Justice Clinic provides students with the opportunity to represent indigent criminal defendants accused of misdemeanor offenses in the Centre County Court of Common Pleas under the supervision of an attorney from the Centre County Public Defender Office. Students learn litigation, negotiation and advocacy skills as they represent defendants through all stages of a criminal case. This hands-on experience is accompanied by a classroom component designed to give students guidance, feedback and an open forum to discuss their cases and the various facets of defense work. The subject matter of the classroom component is designed to follow the progress of each student’s cases as those cases work their way through the various stages of the criminal justice system. The Indigent Criminal Justice Clinic has two primary objectives 1) Provide criminal defendants who cannot afford private counsel with highly effective representation that is client-centered, professional and ethical 2) Create a structured and supervised environment which enables each student to gain a detailed, working knowledge of how to represent a defendant; apply that knowledge to actual criminal cases; and gain feedback and reflection after each important stage of the case. Students earn 5 credits per semester and must commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters (Fall and Spring). Visit the Indigent Criminal Justice Clinic for more information.

Prerequisites:
CORE 934 Professional Responsibility and SKILS955 Evidence. Faculty approval required.
PERSP997A Fall 2013
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

As information technology advances, the legal issues surrounding information privacy and security grow increasingly complicated. This course will explore information privacy and security issues arising from technological change and provide an overview of the current legal regime in the United States meant to address such issues. This overview will take into account constitutional, statutory, contract, and common law sources of information privacy and security law, at both the federal and state level.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW997B Fall 2012
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Title insurance is an integral component in almost every real estate transaction in the United States. This course examines the practical role of Title Insurance pertaining to the conveyance and/or financing of real estate. An emphasis on pragmatic solutions to some of the challenges that arise in the normal course of working with real estate will be explored in this highly interactive class.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 997A Spring 2014
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar will address recent topics in intellectual property law (IP): patent, trade mark and trade secret law. The seminar will address, IP’s jurisprudential and economic underpinnings; the rights of creative professional and artists’ and maker’s rights; the question of property rights in the digital age, competing accounts of patent law and the dispute over open access IP regimes; and finally the doctrinal question of subject matter patentability in the context of DNA and genetically enhanced agricultural products. The seminar will work through the recent and important literature in IP; theoretical questions will be addressed in the context of IP doctrine, including recent landmark IP cases.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 964
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course develops students' skills in common legal writing formats other than memos and briefs. Not intended as a remedial course, this course rather provides an opportunity for students to sharpen legal writing skills with an emphasis on clarity and precision of expression. Weekly writing assignments include a few fully drafted documents (e.g., a short will, a short contract, a statute), as well as letters, short pleadings, jury instructions, and other short pieces. Students will concentrate on re-writing and editing their work.

Prerequisites:
CORE 912 and CORE 914 Legal Research and Writing I and II
Faculty:
CCLAW 971
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course considers private business transactions that cross national boundaries. Topics include formation and enforcement of commercial agreements, forms of international transactions (e.g., agencies, distributorships, licensing agreements, franchising, and foreign subsidiaries), government regulation, electronic commerce, international and cross-cultural business negotiation and techniques for resolution of international business disputes (e.g., judicial procedure, arbitration, mediation). NOTE: Because of overlap in course content, students may not enroll in this course and also International Commercial Transactions (CCLAW980).

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 984
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will consider the law, procedures, and practice of international arbitration, and the substantive rules that govern international commercial sales of goods under the U.N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) and related international instruments. In the course of studying these substantive topics, students will be introduced to and will work through a simulated case study developed for use in the Willem C. Vis International Moot Arbitration Competition. The course is a pre-requisite for participation on the team for the Vis Moot Competition. Participation in the Vis Moot Competition does not require membership on the Moot Court Board. Students who are on the Moot Court Board and who have been selected to participate in another moot competition may take the class for credit, but cannot be considered for participation on the Vis Moot Team. Students who are members of Moot Court Board, but who are not competing in another moot competition, are eligible to participate in the Vis Moot Competition, but should consult the applicable rules to determine their continued responsibilities as members of the Moot Court Board. NOTE: Because of overlap in course content, students may not enroll in both International Commercial Arbitration (INTER984), and International Arbitration (offered in the Florence/Rome/Siena summer study abroad program).

Prerequisites:
Faculty Approval Required
CCLAW 980
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course considers private business transactions that cross national boundaries. Topics include formation and enforcement of commercial agreements, forms of international transactions (e.g., agencies, distributorships, licensing agreements, franchising, and foreign subsidiaries), government regulation, electronic commerce, international and cross-cultural business negotiation and techniques for resolution of international business disputes (e.g., judicial procedure, arbitration, mediation). NOTE: Because of overlap in course content, students may not take this course and also take International Business Transactions (CCLAW 971).

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 997A Spring 2014
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Study of the international regimes for coordinating transnational insolvency cases; comparison of major national domestic insolvency laws.

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 961 Bankruptcy or an insolvency law course at a foreign law school (applicable to LL.M. students)
CRIML 970
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will concern the scope of international criminal law, the definition of international crimes, principles of jurisdiction, procedures for international criminal prosecutions, and examples of international criminal law.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 997C Spring 2014
Credits:
2
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

While the proliferation of international courts and tribunals has been well documented, most study of this phenomenon has been truncated or partial. This colloquium will explore the development, system design, function, and effect of the full range of international tribunals and courts, including the International Court of Justice, regional international courts (such as the European Court of Justice, the European Court of Human Rights, and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, international criminal tribunals, international investment and commercial arbitration, state-to-state arbitration, international claims tribunals (such as the Iran-U.S. Claims Tribunal and the Holocaust claims tribunals), as well as international claims in national courts. The format for the course will be as a colloquium, with guest speakers for each topic, with background reading and discussions developed and led by students. Enrollment limited to: 1) third-year J.D. students; and 2) LLM, and SJD students with instructor permission.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
International Litigation and Arbitration (INTER 966), International Criminal Law (CRIML 970) are recommended.
INTER 981
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Major environmental issues with considerable controversy, uncertainty, or immediacy will be examined in detail (climate change, pandemic flu virus, major natural disaster, etc.). After six weeks of detailed study in the substance of the topics and the decision making process in the international community a simulation game will be conducted based on one of the topics. Teams of students will take on the roles of nations, groups of nations, or extranational organizations (for example USA, China, India, Russia, EU, Group of 77, OPEC, UN, WHO, etc.). They will develop positions based on the most current scientific information and existing policy. The game will progress through a series of moves to which they must respond with new policy positions. These will be the result of real and plausible changes scientific knowledge, economic and environmental conditions, technology, and international power relationships. The game will take approximately five weeks. In addition to content knowledge on the environmental topics; existing laws, treaties, and agreements; and international organizations; students participating in the simulation game will get experience in rapid ingest of data, analysis, negotiations, presentation techniques, preparation of analytical briefs, and leadership under pressure, much like the real world. The results of the game will then be debriefed and deconstructed, and critically analyzed to gain insights into both the issue and how various interested parties or groups will likely be affected and how they might respond.

 

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SEM 948
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar examines selected aspects of international financial, securities, and banking law. It covers broadly four areas: First, it provides elements of financial law. This includes legal aspects of banking, securities, and money; the objectives of regulations and supervision; an overview of US regulation; and the public and private law of international monetary obligations. Secondly, it examines aspects of international financial and securities regulation. This includes an examination of the financial crisis of 2008 and the regulatory reforms resulting from it; selected comparative aspects of regulation in the US and the EU through a detailed discussion of legislation and case law (e.g. institutional structure, insider trading, rating agencies). Thirdly, it discusses economic and monetary union in the EU and the eurozone crisis. Finally, it provides an overview of the law of the IMF and the international financial architecture.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 971
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course introduces students to key concepts and doctrines of international law. It examines the sources of international law such as custom and treaty, the bases of international jurisdiction, issues of statehood, recognition and succession, nationality, international agreements, and U.S. participation in the international legal system. The course provides students with the basics needed for both public and private international law practice.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 966
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is intended to acquaint students with the impact of globalization upon the process of litigation. It focuses upon the adjudicatory resolution of disputes created by international contracts and global business transactions through the standard legal trial process and arbitration. Various basic topics are treated, including (1) the certification and training of international lawyers; (2) the liability exposure of multinational enterprises; (3) the State as an actor in global commerce; (4) problems of comparative jurisdiction, service of process and evidence-gathering, proof of foreign law, and the enforcement of foreign judgments; (5) the extraterritorial application of national law; and (6) attempts to establish a transborder law and legal process. The course also provides a thorough introduction to international arbitration and investor-state arbitration.

Prerequisites:
None
IHSDP 995
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The International Sustainable Development Projects Law Clinic partners with university-sponsored medical, humanitarian engineering and social entrepreneurship programs, and with foreign entrepreneurs with sustainable business objectives. Students will evaluate legal issues, advise stakeholders, and solve obstacles to implementation of collaborators’ ventures in the developing world.  Clinic students will help physicians, engineers and entrepreneurs bring ideas to fruition in an international, interdisciplinary setting, while improving the lives of people in communities at the base of the economic pyramid.  Students earn 4 credits with the possibility of 1 additional credit for summer international travel and work. Visit the International Sustainable Development Projects Law Clinic website for more information.

Advanced International Sustainable Development Projects Law Clinic

Prerequisites:
Faculty approval required.
Faculty:
TAX 992
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course treats the unique problems concerning U.S. taxation of the foreign income and operations of U.S. persons and enterprises and the incidence of U.S. taxation on foreign persons and enterprises, including the following basic topics: the tax treatment of international business and investments, sales and financing, the sourcing of income, inclusions and exclusions, the foreign tax credit, controlled foreign corporations, and tax avoidance. This course stresses the role of international tax treaties and examines, on a comparative basis, the tax rules of other countries in order to better understand our own system and to gain an understanding of the overall impact of taxation in the international setting.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 973
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the legal framework for international trade and its potential for growth and conflict with other areas of international law. It focuses on the North American Free Trade Agreement and the World Trade Organization family of agreements, including the General Agreement of Tariffs and Trade. The course explores the fundamental principles embodied in international trade law, the expansion of trade agreements into new areas such as investment and intellectual property rights, and the potential conflicts between such agreements and efforts to protect labor rights and the environment. The course will analyze decisions by international trade tribunals as well as the texts of the treaties themselves.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 968
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

A study and analysis of the world's major United Nations-sponsored international human rights treaties with an eye toward measuring the relative treaty compliance of the nations that drafted, adopted and ratified them. Do the citizens of ratifying nations have appreciably less to fear from their governments than they had had before the multilateral human rights treaties entered into force?

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
INTPR 951
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course presents the range of legal issues arising from the emergence of cyberspace. The course considers how the law has reacted to challenges posed by the Internet as well as how the law is shaping its future. Specific areas covered include jurisdictional analysis, First Amendment/free speech, digital copyrights, trademarks and domain names, electronic privacy, e-commerce, and Internet governance.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
LLMLW 903
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course is offered through Penn State’s World Campus. The course introduces students to fundamental concepts of U.S. common law analysis and methods. The course will explore the function of case law within a common law system. Students will consider how judicial opinions interact with other sources of law, and the methods common law lawyers use to analyze cases. Students will apply this knowledge to legal problems and build English language skills for clear legal communication.

Prerequisites:
J.D. and resident LL.M. students may not enroll. Credits do not count toward the Penn State LL.M. degree.
INTPR 952
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will survey the protection of proprietary rights in inventions, writings, creative expression, trade secrets, and other intangible intellectual products by federal patent, copyright, trademark and unfair competition law, and by state trade secrecy and unfair competition law.  A central theme will be the challenges to traditional legal paradigms posed by new technologies and the shift to an information-based economy.  The course is intended for all students who anticipate having corporate clients and seek a basic understanding of the laws applicable to key assets of most businesses, as well as for students interested in becoming intellectual property specialists.  This course does not replace (and is not a prerequisite for) Copyrights, Patent Law, Trademarks, or any other intellectual property course.

Prerequisites:
None
INTPR 997A – Spring 2013 and Spring 2014
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will survey the protection of proprietary rights in inventions, writings, creative expression, trade secrets, and other intangible intellectual products by federal patent, copyright, trademark and unfair competition law, and by state trade secrecy and unfair competition law. A central theme will be the challenges to traditional legal paradigms posed by new technologies and the shift to an information-based economy. The course is intended for all students who anticipate having corporate clients and seek a basic understanding of the laws applicable to key assets of most businesses, as well as for students interested in becoming intellectual property specialists. This course does not replace (and is not a prerequisite for) Copyrights, Patent Law, Trademarks, or any other intellectual property course.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 985
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course provides an accessible approach to developing the research, empirical and analysis skills necessary for International Affairs careers and research. The approach is hands-on, with a focus on providing practical skills for evaluating real-world arguments and policies. The course will familiarize students with a variety of International Affairs methods (e.g. experiments, social networks, and data sources).

Prerequisites:
None
LLMLW 900
Credits:
2
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

To develop a good foundation for the LL.M. students' other course work, this course introduces the United States court system, the role of the Constitution in the United States legal system, and other foundation materials in United States law. The goal is to introduce students to distinctive aspects and/or fundamental principles in U.S. law. Enrollment in this course is limited to LL.M. candidates.

Prerequisites:
Enrollment limited to LL.M. candidates
LLMLW 907
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course is offered through Penn State’s World Campus. The course will examine common forms of business entities in the U.S. and the legal structure in which the entities operate. The course will introduce commercial law frequently encountered in business, including sales, negotiable instruments, and secured transactions. The course will require analysis of case law and statutory interpretation.

Prerequisites:
J.D. and resident LL.M. students may not enroll. Credits may be counted toward the Penn State LL.M. degree.
SKILS 968 effective Spring 2014
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Students will learn about the role of a judicial clerk and how to draft judicial opinions. Students will recognize the impact of written advocacy on judicial opinion writing as they switch roles from advocating as a lawyer to deciding issues raised by the advocates and writing opinions that implement subtle persuasive writing techniques. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the process for creation of legal precedent through opinions, including the impact of standards of review and procedural posture. The course will cover the common forms of judicial writing. With individualized feedback, students will develop precision in self-editing and revision skills and will practice producing concise, clear, and accessible written work.

Prerequisites:
CORE 912 and CORE 914 Legal Analysis, Research and Writing I and II
CRIML 974
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the legal position of the child in society and the extent to which the child may be legally controlled by parent(s) or state. Subject matters include the right of the child to control reproductive decision-making, child support and paternity issues, child pornography and minors' access to pornography, child abuse and neglect, foster care, termination of parental rights, adoption, medical treatment of juveniles, and medical experimentation on juveniles. The course also examines the delinquency jurisdiction of juvenile court, the constitutional protections afforded the child accused of criminal activity, adjudications of delinquency, punishment or placement of the child in the dispositional phase of juvenile proceedings, and treatment of the child as an adult offender.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 929
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Examination of laws and public policies affecting older adults and families, including health & long-term care. This seminar will analyze demographic trends of aging world populations, including alternative public benefit and private retirement strategies affected by laws. Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, protection of older adults, long-term care planning, and consumer protection laws will be introduced, with opportunities for students to select individual topics for in-depth research, writing and presentation in class. The seminar will also examine roles for specialists in elder law, whether in private practice or as public advocates.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 926
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Major issues and concepts in law and social policy regarding individuals with handicaps are introduced. Topics include: income maintenance programs, special education, federal and state anti-discrimination laws, accessibility, special health issues, institutionalization and de-institutionalization.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
RP&EL 997A Spring 2014
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course will address current legal and policy aspects of shale oil and gas development. Students will focus on the major policy issues that are shaping — and have shaped — the development of the law in the early years of the so-called "Shale Revolution." Among the topics expected to be covered: role of shale oil and gas in our national energy portfolio, determining the appropriate regulatory entity to oversee developmental activities; managing economic benefits at the individual, community, and state level in the short and long term; environmental concerns; government role in developing new technologies and expanding markets for product; and international development.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 928
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Legal semiotics is the study of law focusing signs and symbols as well as the construction of meaning in law in legal discourse. Law's communicative structures are essential in this context. Moreover, recent large-scale economic, political and social developments in the Western hemisphere have increased the need to expand our knowledge about law, and semiotic studies sustain that need.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 927
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The objectives of this course include an examination of the interface between law and the arts with an eye to both theoretical and practical implications and a striving to identify creative and serviceable solutions to the problems that have frustrated the growth and harvest of the creative effort. The investigation will be directed toward subject areas that reflect functional divisions within the arts; i.e., the visual arts, dance, music, the literary arts, and areas such as television and film. The course includes a mandatory overnight field trip to New York City at the students' expense. It is a prerequisite for the Art, Sports, and Entertainment Law Clinic.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 952
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The course aims to offer thorough instruction on the foundations and sources of the law of the sea, the principle types of maritime jurisdiction, the principles of resource management, and approaches to the settlement of maritime disputes.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 931
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar provides students with an opportunity to analyze and discuss ethical and legal issues relating to representation of business entities. Issues covered include (1) who is the client for the lawyer who represents a business entity; (2) what special rules govern confidentiality and information sharing in the representation of a business entity; (3) how should a lawyer respond to evidence of client fraud or other illegal activities; (4) what are the potential liabilities for furnishing legal advice or providing legal opinions for business transactions that are later found to have been fraudulent or illegal; (5) when is a business entity required or permitted to reimburse employees for legal expenses relating to their employment activities; and (6) what special obligations and responsibilities are imposed on "in-house" attorneys who are full-time employees of a business entity.

Prerequisites:
CORE 934 Professional Responsibility and CCLAW 963 Corporations
Faculty:
CORE 912
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The Legal Analysis, Research & Writing (“LARW”) course is designed to teach each student to think, write, and speak like a lawyer. Students must learn to solve clients’ problems by using effective research techniques, accurate and in-depth legal analysis, and clear and concise written and oral communication. These skills will improve only with practice. Therefore, the LARW course uses a problem-solving approach through which students will represent a fictional client and provide those clients with legal advice. Through this approach, students will learn essential skills of successful lawyers, including researching legal authorities, applying the law to a client’s situation, and communicating that analysis in writing and verbally. In LARW I, the focus is on objective analysis and writing. Students learn to draft the primary tool for communicating objective analysis, which is the office memorandum. Students receive individual feedback from their professor throughout the course.

Prerequisites:
None
CORE 914
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

LARW II continues to build on the skills learned in LARW I. Students continue to analyze clients’ problems using various sources of legal authority, to use additional research sources, and to further refine their writing style. However, LARW II focuses on persuasive writing, so students will learn to draft documents that are submitted to a court called “briefs” or “memoranda of law.” Students also will learn to present an oral argument to a court. LARW II continues to implement the problem-solving approach to teach persuasive writing, and students continue to receive individualized feedback throughout the course.​

Prerequisites:
CORE 912 Legal Analysis, Research and Writing I
LLMLW 903
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The course covers foundational principles of US common law, statutory analysis, and legal methods with an emphasis on development of English communication skills for legal professionals. Students develop writing, speaking and listening skills and gain experience and confidence in English communication in law school, and in legal professional contexts.

Prerequisites:
Enrollment limited to LL.M. candidates. Faculty approval required.
SKILS 969
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Students will learn journalistic writing styles to prepare them to contribute accurate and accessible legal information and analysis to general interest and legal trade media as legal analysts or professional journalists. For legal trade publication work, the emphasis will be on readability and appropriate depth for a professional audience. Students will learn journalistic standards of truth and interviewing techniques for print and broadcast media. Live broadcast techniques, including live interview hosting, will also be covered.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SKILS 988
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is an introduction to law relevant to assisting people in poverty including law addressing public benefits, housing, consumer issues, custody, domestic violence, and private rights of action. It will also address realities of existence for people in poverty and consider historical and policy perspectives. Finally, the course will focus on some practical skills, and students will participate in mock hearings and/or mock interviews.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
GOVMT 970
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course deals with the enactment and construction of statutes with specific attention to the organization, procedures and powers of federal and state legislative bodies, to statutory drafting and construction, and to lobbying.

Prerequisites:
None
INTPR 982
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The retention of the intellectual property or the absolute transfer of such interests to other for purposes of economic exploitation is, however, declining in use and popularity. Rather, it has evolved that maximization of the holder's value in the intellectual property may, in some circumstances, be better achieved by sharing some of the rights, while retaining others. This is the topic of the course in the licensing of intellectual property. The offering explores the myriad business, legal, and negotiating issues involved in the drafting and use of intellectual property licensing agreements.

Prerequisites:
Students must have taken at least one of the following courses: INTPR 960 Copyrights, INTPR 985 Trademarks, and/or INTPR 980 Patent Law; or receive specific permission of the faculty member after demonstrating special qualifications for the subject matter.
LLMLW 901
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course explores U.S. common law analytical methods and discourse. Students will analyze cases and statutes to solve client problems. Students will draft objective memoranda and other documents to communicate their legal analysis in writing. Students will also learn the basics of U.S. legal research.

Prerequisites:
Enrollment limited to LL.M. candidates
SKILS 972
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N
Conflicts between parties with different views of “the public good” are often difficult to resolve, especially in the environmental and natural resource arena. The judicial dispute resolution process is often not well-adapted to addressing conflicts among jurisdictions and meeting the interests of the public and private parties affected by the conflict. Mediation and other alternative dispute resolution techniques can be very useful tools in these cases. The course uses case studies and simulations to explore techniques and strategies other than traditional litigation that lawyers can use to represent clients and resolve disputes in these settings. The course will address on-going efforts to relicense the Conowingo Dam on the Lower Susquehanna River (set within the clean-up efforts for Chesapeake Bay) as a case study, but will also examine other environmental and public issues as well.
Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 993
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The purposes of the course are to provide the student with (1) a fundamental understanding of the finance and economics of the M&A marketplace, and (2) the basic skills needed to succeed in various professional capacities in the M&A marketplace, such as investment banker, management consultant, strategic planner, and lawyer.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 968
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y
This course will introduce students to the multinational corporation as object and source of law and legal regulation, and the role of multinational corporations in world affairs. The course has been developed for both upper-class law students and students in the School of International Affairs for have completed their first year course work. Globalization is central to the study of the regulatory and policy framework of multinational corporations, and their relationships with states and other non-state actors. Since the early 1970s, with their huge market power and advanced R&D capabilities, MNCs have been seen by some astute observers as purveyors of global efficiency, while at the same time being accused by others of using their transnational leverage and largesse to foster economic and technological dependency, especially among the developing nations. Ironically, however, this once "highly politicized" latter view seems to have given way to a more balanced perspective; most nations are scurrying around to ensure their economies can secure high levels of foreign investment from MNCs so they can better integrate with the mainstream of the international economy. With globalization’s objectives of reducing the barriers to the movement of people, capital and technology across the globe, the MNC has been able to penetrate economies in virtually every part of the world. The result has been a fundamental shift in the relationship of multinational corporations to both law and public policy. With the deepening of the framework and legal structures of globalization, multinational corporations have been transformed from a mere object of law making, like individuals, to organizations that themselves now create law and legal structures. Additionally, the frameworks within which multinational corporations now serve as both objects and sources of law has expanded from relations only with the domestic legal orders of states to deep association with governance structures at the international level, including those of both public and private entities. Students will first consider the conceptual framework within which MNCs operate, including its business and legal forms, its relations with states and international organizations. Students will then consider MNC regulation by home and host states, and then examine the emerging system of international regulation by public bodies and through transnational systems of self regulation.
Prerequisites:
None, however, CCLAW 963 Corporations is recommended
PERSP 953
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the domestic and international legal framework governing the use of national security powers by the U.S. government. After introducing the structures and decision-making processes of the defense, intelligence, and law enforcement communities, the course will carefully examine the use of force both abroad and within the U.S., intelligence collection, and the role of law enforcement in national security operations and prosecutions, to include counterterrorism. Throughout the course, consideration will be given to the appropriate balance between liberty and security, the proper allocation of power between the three branches of government, and the tension between national security objectives and international obligations.

 

Prerequisites:
None
RP&EL 988
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course provides a basic overview of federal and state regulations and of the common law affecting title to and exploitation of such resources as water, coal, oil, gas, and public lands. Common mineral leasing provisions are given particular emphasis.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 960
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course combines the law and ethics of negotiation, mediation and settlement with economic and psychological bargaining theory and regular hands-on practice in representing clients in negotiation and mediation. Bargaining theory (including distributive and integrative bargaining), relevant socio-psychological research, negotiation and mediation ethics, the law of settlement, and the basics of contract drafting are all introduced. Instruction consists of assigned reading, a series of simulations and exercises (including drafting a resulting contract), written negotiation planning and self-evaluation, feedback, and group discussion. The course also may involve participation in a full-day Saturday program, and students should be prepared to experiment with various means to maximize their facility in using videoconferencing and other technologies to negotiate and represent clients in mediation. Prerequisite for Dispute System Design Seminar.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 954
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course presents an overview of laws and policies that affect the nonprofit sector, a vital component of national and international economies. Students will examine alternative legal structures (including how to form a nonprofit corporation under U.S. law), federal and selected state tax laws, fiduciary duties of governing boards, charitable gifting rules, restrictions on private inurement, and the important roles played by nonprofits nationally and globally. The course will permit students to examine specific legal issues relating to selected nonprofit organizations such as religious organizations, private schools, hospitals and long-term care facilities, social clubs, trade and professional organizations or political organizations. Students may engage in comparative examination of practices and foreign laws of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs).

Prerequisites:
None
RP&EL 965
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will address the basic concepts in oil and gas law within the United States as well as the specific legal issues associated with the development of the Marcellus Shale formation. This specific topics to be covered include the ownership or oil and gas, oil and gas leasing, oil and gas conservation laws, oil and gas interests, and government regulation of development.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 972
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Selected practical problems involving the operations of the small business enterprise and its owners are examined. Topics include: Legally hiring and firing employees; employee privacy; governmental intervention and compliance; handling governmental agency issues (IRS, SEC, DoL, etc.); business expansion; cessation of a business; business divorce and family business planning and transition. The course will provide practical experience for students who wish to become transactional attorneys through business problems designed to allow them to identify relevant issues and draft documents resolving those issues.

 

Prerequisites:
TAX 949 Basic Federal Income Taxation , CCLAW 963 Corporations and CCLAW 955 Agency, Partnerships, and Limited Liability Entities strongly recommended
Faculty:
TAX 980
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines the income tax consequences of the formation, operation, and liquidation of a partnership, the classification of an entity as a partnership, distributions by a partnership, and sales of partnership interests.

Prerequisites:
TAX 949 Basic Federal Income Taxation
INTPR 980
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is an examination of the legal requirements for obtaining patent protection for an invention. The statutory foundations of United States patent law are examined through an analysis of patent prosecution practice and patent litigation. The course also considers United States patent practice in the context of international intellectual property law.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 978
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Payment Systems and Financial Transactions is a general overview of the law of negotiable instruments (e.g., checks), and other mechanisms for making payments, including credit cards, debit cards, ACH payments, and wire transfers. The course also will cover credit enhancement systems such as guaranties and letters of credit. The course will address both uniform state law (UCC Articles 3, 4, 4A, and 5), and applicable federal statutes and regulations (such as the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Truth-in-Lending Act, and the Electronic Fund Transfers Act).

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 997B Spring 2013
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

In the modern economy commercial parties use a variety of payment mechanisms. This course provides an overview of different payment systems (including checks, credit and debit cards, wire transfers, and letters of credit), the credit system, and the devices that enhance creditworthiness (including guaranties and letters of credit). Classroom discussion is devoted almost exclusively to developing analyses of written problems contained in the course text. Because this course requires familiarity with the Uniform Commercial Code, students should take another Uniform Commercial Code course prior to or concurrently with this course.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
CRIML 981
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course is a step-by-step analysis of the procedure, planning, tactics, and strategy in defending and prosecuting a criminal case in Pennsylvania from pre-arrest through appeal. Special emphasis is placed on all aspects of the procedure and law relating to the suppression of evidence.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 982
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This class will acquaint the student with civil procedure at the state trial court level. Using Pennsylvania as the model, the course traces a civil case from service of process to trial and includes discussion of venue, pleadings, discovery and dispositive motions. The course also deals with other important aspects of civil practice including statutes of limitation, comparative negligence, compulsory arbitration and settlement.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 946
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This seminar is designed to improve students’ understanding of the theoretical and policy justifications underlying the prosecution of white collar crime. Students will examine current issues in the debate over corporate criminal liability, prosecutorial discretion, the use of plea agreements to achieve structural reform of corporations, and the federalization of crime. In addition, the class will examine white collar crime in particular industries such as health care and securities regulation. Students will examine these issues both theoretically and practically by reviewing law review articles, Department of Justice policies, pleadings, and case studies on some of the most notorious white collar crime cases in recent years.

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 997D Spring 2014
Credits:
2

The course will examine the legal frameworks embedded in the concept of the American Dream -- the proposition that the next generation will have the opportunity to do better than their parents. Through reading and research assignments and structured class debates, students will examine the process of law creation in the U.S. government, and the legal, legislative and organizational challenges required to achieve public support for an agenda. Select provisions of federal laws – including the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), Affordable Care Act, and U.S.A. Patriot Act - will be used to illustrate law making and achieve an understanding of the legislative process.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
INTER 997D Fall 2011
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The course will analyze the concepts of: State sovereignty, national security and the right to self defense; and then consider the operations of the United Nations Security Council, Alliances, and the impact of international law, in particular arms control agreements. Students will be asked to identify changes in the habits of relationships between States which could improve the maintenance of international peace and security.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
CRIML 984
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This is a study of guilty pleas and sentencing alternatives, post-conviction remedies, parole, probation, commutation, and pardon. The course will also examine the law of corrections and prisoners' rights.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
FMEST 970
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course deals primarily with the handling of estates following death. Emphasis is thus placed on accounts and distribution, the responsibilities of estate administrators and personal representatives, inheritance tax problems, and will contests. Other topics include avoidance of probate and the drafting of wills.

Prerequisites:
FMEST 960 Trusts and Estates
CCLAW 982
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course incorporates and expands the concepts derived from the basic Torts, Contracts, and Uniform Commercial Code coverage of products liability. Emphasis will be on the substantive and procedural law of contract, negligence, and strict liability developed by courts and administrative tribunals. Proposals for legislative reforms will also be studied.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CORE 934
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Through the use of hypothetical situations, this course attempts to generate student sensitivity to ethical problems faced by lawyers in various kinds of practice. The ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the older Code of Professional Responsibility are the basic tools, but discussion centers as well on case law, ABA opinions and standards, statutes, and the dictates of conscience. Discipline and professional malpractice are also treated.

Prerequisites:
None
CORE 920
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course introduces the basic concepts and principles in the law of property. Topics include: acquisition and allocation of property rights; restrictions on owners' rights to use, limit access to, and sell or dispose of their property; and the relationships among multiple owners of rights in the same property. The emphasis is on real property, although the course also addresses intellectual property and other types of personal property.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 933
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

With the perception that the federal judiciary is increasingly hostile to constitutional claims, individuals have turned to state constitutions as an independent source of rights in civil and criminal litigation. This course will explore the unique procedures and methods of state constitutional rights interpretation. In lieu of an examination, persons enrolled in the course will brief questions of state constitutional law in an arena where the United States Constitution fails to afford protection.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SEM 934
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The purpose of this seminar is to facilitate discussion and understanding of the role law has played in both the subordination and promotion of the rights of people of color in America . Subjects for discussion will include race and the American criminal justice system, hate speech and the First Amendment, affirmative action policies, and the quest for effective schools.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
RP&EL 964
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The course covers transactional drafting techniques for any commercial matter, and negotiation exercises useful in all legal settings. It then addresses the structure and law of real estate transactions, including agreements of sale, title and survey matters, leasing, financing, easements, and development rights.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 979
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will focus on the regulation of commercial banks in the U.S, and will include an overview of the regulation of other financial institutions, such as insurers, securities brokers-dealers and investment companies.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 986
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Remedial devices focusing on the theory and application of legal and equitable relief are analyzed comparatively. The course covers the procedural and substantive law elements of damages, specific performance, injunctions, declaratory judgments, reformation, rescission, and restitution.

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 954
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course will address relationships and responsibilities of representing the professional athlete. Students will also get an introduction and in-depth examination of Representation through group exercises, class discussions and professional contract analysis. There will be time dedicated to the NCAA Rules that affect Agent interaction with potential clients and individual State enacted laws governing the modern Agent.

 

Prerequisites:
None
IHRED 995
Credits:
--
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The Rural Economic Development Clinic will provide students with practical legal experience representing individuals and entities in Pennsylvania's rural communities, primarily within the broad fields of agricultural, food, and energy law. Students will work with agricultural producers, businesses, landowners, and nonprofit organizations on specific projects that will involve transactional work such as preparing / reviewing contracts, addressing basic business entity issues, and providing general legal counsel.

Students will receive instruction on basic skills associated with legal practice including those required to interact with clients. Students also will receive instruction in any substantive area necessary to represent their clients. This instruction will be provided in a group and individual setting. As part of their clinic responsibilities, students will interact directly with clients to ascertain the legal issues presented, advise the clients on the recommended legal strategy, and prepare or review any necessary legal documentation to effectuate the legal strategy. Visit the Rural Economic Development Clinic website for more information.

Prerequisites:
CCLAW 956 Agricultural Law suggested but not required, Faculty approval required.
Faculty:
SEM 970
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This 2-credit seminar is concerned with the development of the law, legal system, and legal institutions of what is popularly known as Russia but also correctly and officially known as the Russian Federation within the boundaries presently occupied and, historically, within the boundaries of the Russian Empire. By “law” we mean formal legislation, customary rules, relevant international legal rules, legal doctrine, and anything else regarded by the Russian State or by Russian jurists as comprising part of the “law.” For our purposes “legal institutions” encompasses all law enforcement agencies or any other agencies of the State or empowered by the state which are concerned with the law in any manner whatsoever, including educational institutions.

Prerequisites:
None
CCLAW 984
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Article Two of the Uniform Commercial Code is an integrated body of statutory law that prescribes the rights and obligations of parties involved in transactions in goods. Although we will review general principles of contract law and contrast them with the approach adopted in Article Two, this course emphasizes the special techniques of statutory construction utilized in interpreting a code as opposed to an isolated statute. Classroom discussion is devoted almost exclusively to developing analyses of written problems distributed to the students in advance of the class. The problems require students to fashion arguments based on the statutory language. The problems also require students to develop an understanding of the legal and commercial context based on the assigned readings, and then to interpret the statutory language in light of this context. The course topics are: code methodology (including the history and jurisprudence of Article Two), contract formation and interpretation, performance obligations, breach and remedies.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 971
Credits:
1
Credit Only: Y Anon Gr: N

This course provides students with the framework for developing a thesis, conducting research, and producing a significant scholarly paper. In an interactive workshop setting, students will discuss progress and receive feedback from faculty and fellow students on: (1) identification and refinement of a thesis; (2) developing and implementing a research plan; (3) appropriate use of authority, including legal citation form; and (4) developing and refining a critical perspective and scholarly argument.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None, however, please note that students MUST be concurrently enrolled in a seminar (SEM) or Independent Study (PERSP996) for at least 2 credits.
Faculty:
CCLAW 952
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course deals with the creation, enforcement, and priorities of personal property security interests under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and related statutes. It addresses:(a) encumbrances on consumer, commercial, and industrial goods, (b) inventory and receivables financing for manufacturers, distributors, and dealers, and (c) personal property agricultural financing. Relevant provisions of other Articles of the UCC and other state and federal statutes are integrated into the course as required.

Prerequisites:
None
SKILS 997A Spring 2014
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Designed for students who want to improve their ability to understand and communicate with native Spanish-speaking colleagues and clients in a legal setting. Includes practical reading, speaking, and writing exercises using real documents from Spanish-speaking courts, practicing attorneys, and statutory law. Also encompasses an introduction to research resources, citation norms, and other tools related to practicing law in Spanish, and will include discussions of regional variations in law and language in the Spanish legal world and the ethics and responsibilities of non-native speakers practicing law in Spanish. Guest speakers or other contact with native Spanish-speaking attorneys and/or judges may also be scheduled. Students will meet with the professor for a short one-on-one discussion in Spanish at least once during the semester.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
Faculty approval required
PERSP 999
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course explores how various areas of the law impact the sports industry. The "law" that is used by most sports lawyers is principally the application of settled principles of other legal fields to the sports industry: contract law, labor law, tax law, products liability law, intellectual property law, etc.

The Sports Law course, then focuses on important areas that provide the foundational principles that drive the outcome of most legal disputes arising in the sports industry. The course also examines on certain areas of the law such as antitrust, labor, and constitutional law, that have specific and unique applications to sports.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
GOVMT 987
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Important issues in governmental organization and management are surveyed. Emphasis is placed on intergovernmental relations, the legislative process, personnel issues, financing, and contracting. The course will conclude with a consideration of recent trends toward metropolitan regionalism.

Prerequisites:
None
TAX 988
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

Beginning with historical and constitutional aspects, students will analyze in detail recent developments in state and local taxation and their impact on client representation. Attention will be concentrated on corporate, sales and use and other business taxes, death duties, and property taxes and exemptions.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SKILS 952
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of ways lawyers use primary and secondary legal research sources and finding tools to successfully represent their clients. An emphasis is placed on the development of effective legal research strategies that take into account choice of format (e.g., the relative advantages and disadvantages of print and electronic sources), cost/benefit analysis of format choice, evolving approaches by law firms and private practitioners to billable research hours, use of computerized tools to organize research results, and presentation of research results to case supervisors. Course content will be presented in a hybrid format consisting of two hours per week of in-class meetings with the remaining credit to be completed by coursework outside scheduled class time through online and written assignments.

Prerequisites:
CORE 912 Legal Analysis, Research and Writing I and CORE 914 Legal Analysis, Research and Writing II
LABOR 997A Fall 2013
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course presents a broad survey of both the common law rules and major statutes that govern the relationship between employers and employees. Students will learn about the evolution of the law governing the workplace, and about the interplay of State and Federal laws and regulations commonly encountered by attorneys practicing employment law. The topics covered include the legal nature of the employment relationship, employment at-will and its limitations, compensation for workplace injuries, worker safety, wage and hour laws, employee privacy, noncompetition agreements, the protection of trade secrets, and the arbitration of employment related disputes. While the course will provide a broad overview of anti-discrimination law, the substantial body of legal issues on that subject will not be addressed in detail. The course will not address Labor Law or Employee Benefits.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
TAX 952
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This class will focus on the tax and ERISA aspects associated with executive compensation and nonqualified deferred compensation, including a variety of executive perquisites, equity programs and fringe benefits. The course will address the applicable income tax reporting and withholding rules for employer-provided meals, lodging, transportation and other miscellaneous section 132 fringe benefits. In this course students will also learn about the tax doctrines of constructive receipt and economic benefit, as well as the requirements found in section 409A and section 83. Also covered will be the special tax rules for employees of tax exempt entities under section 457(b) and section 457(f).

 

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CCLAW 994
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will examine and debate a series of legal and regulatory issues raised by spectrum management, broadcasting, cable television, common carrier, Internet, resource allocation, and technology planning topics.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
CL&CR 957
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course examines current constitutional doctrine concerning religion under the First Amendment to the Constitution. The focus will be on the essential cases and principles of the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment. These cases and principles are organized along three thematic lines: (1) the regulation of religious activity (free exercise and neutrality, governmental interests, legislative accommodation), (2) the funding of religious activity (establishment and neutrality, governmental support of religious institutions), and (3) the treatment of religion in government's culture shaping activities (public schools, school curriculum, religious speech). The course ends with a discussion of the definition of "religion" for purposes of federal constitutional law.

Prerequisites:
None
LABOR 962
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course covers common law employment doctrines (at-will employment, contract and tort erosions of at-will employment, employee duties, including the duty of loyalty and trade secrets), noncompetition agreements, and employee rights in inventions, and workplace injuries (including workers compensation, OSHA, and criminal and tort approaches to promoting a safe workplace).

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
LABOR 966
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Employer-provided pension and health care programs play a critical role in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. They also affect corporations, financial markets, and the economy as a whole. Employee benefit programs are, in short, an important staple of modern law practice. This course surveys the Employee Retirement Income Security Act and relevant portions of the Internal Revenue Code. Classes examine what benefit plans must do regarding reporting and disclosure, accrual, vesting, funding, and fiduciary standards. The course covers health care reform, the shift from defined benefit to defined contribution programs, and the effect of stock market volatility on benefit programs. Throughout the semester, students examine the policy goals underpinning federal benefits law. The course surveys major issues in ERISA litigation, including that statute's claims and remedies provisions, as well as its preemption of state law.

Prerequisites:
None
INTER 997B Spring 2013
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course will examine the role of just war theory as it relates to the laws of war (or to the law of armed conflict). The course will examine the history and development of the theory, and explore its application to the legal paradigms relating to the use of force under international law: targeted killings, intervention, responsibility to protect, detention as well as the legal and strategic definitional challenges posed by non-state actors.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
PERSP 951
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course will provide a survey of selected topics in the twentieth-century history of American law, with a focus on the rise of the modern administrative state. Among the topics expected to be covered: legal formalism and its progressive and legal-realist critiques; the rise of corporations; the labor and liability explosion; the New Deal and the rise of banking and securities regulation; and deregulation in the 1980s.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SEM 907
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

This course examines the contribution of the judiciary to political governance in comparative perspective. It focuses on the Supreme Court and the European Court of Justice, which is the highest court of the European Union. It also takes into account selectively judgments of other constitutional courts. It seeks to explore the function of judicial review in modern democracy through a study of judicial decisions in selected areas. It examines the relationship between the judiciary and the other organs of government and the role of courts in protecting the citizen. It focuses on the following areas: federalism, the protection of human rights, the principles of democracy, non-discrimination, equality, proportionality, legitimate expectations, and fair hearing; Locus standi, remedies for the protection of constitutional rights, and the liability of public bodies and state agencies.

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 938
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The Supreme Court, including procedure and practice, principles of adjudication, and history, as well as the topics of the current term are studied. Students are required to present analyses of current cases as well as an analytical paper on approved topics of constitutional law.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
SKILS 962
Credits:
3
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

This course provides an introduction to the domestic law and practice of arbitration. It assesses the statutory and decisional law basis for arbitration, especially the provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act. It investigates the central doctrinal issues in the field: the enforceability of unilaterally-imposed arbitration agreements, the arbitrability of statutory rights — in particular, civil rights matters, and the use of contract to establish the law of arbitration between the arbitrating parties. Emphasis is placed upon practical problems that have emerged in the practice of arbitration law: the selection of arbitrators, the use of discovery and evidence-gathering in arbitral proceedings, and the content of arbitration agreements. The course also addresses the new uses of arbitration in consumer, health, and employment fields. NOTE: Because of overlap in course content, students may not enroll in both The U.S. Law of Arbitration (SKILS962 offered during the academic year) and U.S. Law of Arbitration (offered in the Summer Program in Arbitration Law, Montreal, Quebec, Canada).

Prerequisites:
None
SEM 941
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: N

The inexorable paces of globalization and interdependence have made the need for international cooperation more acute. The role of the United Nations in these processes has become both more relevant and controversial. Notwithstanding the critical voices that have questioned the relevance or usefulness of the world body from certain national perspectives and points of view, the United Nations, through its activities and programmes, continues to have a considerable impact on countries and societies around the world, in such areas as conflict prevention and resolution, control of population displacements, humanitarian action, and social and economic development. These considerations, among others, make a study of the United Nations and International law more important today than it has ever been.

Prerequisites:
None
Faculty:
PERSP 997B Spring 2012
Credits:
3

The course will examine economic, moral and distributive justice theories that underlie private rights and relationships between persons.  Students will learn and apply these theories to analyze and critique selected legal problems of international and global significance including person-hood and its relationship to consent and idiosyncratic value, innovation, artistic expression and property rights regimes, the compensatory, deterrent and corrective role of tort and criminal law, claims hierarchy in bankruptcy, and agency and control issues in business organization law, with particular attention to questions of law firm financing and the delivery of legal services.  In addressing these problems, the course will highlight the interconnectedness of sovereign nations and economies.

*Special topic course

Prerequisites:
None
CORE 925
Credits:
4
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

Tort law seeks to remedy civil wrongs that result in harm to person or property. The class will focus on basic concepts such as the intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, and products liability.

Prerequisites:
None
INTPR 985
Credits:
2
Credit Only: N Anon Gr: Y

The law of trademarks is central to the concept of fair dealing in the commercial environment. The history of common law and statutory trademarks is explored as well as registration, conveyancing and foreign rights. The course deals with the duty of the merchant to compete honestly and remedies for failure to do so.

Prerequisites:
None

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